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David Kennedy


Nine Poetics


Nine Poetics Contains
:

· Today I am doing only easy jobs.

· The meaning of this word is neither “mirror” nor “clock”.

· On this side there is only an entrance and there doesn’t appear to be an exit.

· Before I went to the exhibition I had my shoes cleaned.

· My friend said he had never seen so splendid a monkey.

· Please do not break the glass lid.

· How many churches have you built?

· Today’s story is completely different from the usual one.

· I have decreased the weight of this luggage.


Instructions for Use:

· Nine Poetics contains everything you need to make a poetics that will last you for your entire writing life. Nine Poetics is not guaranteed because it will never wear out.

· Some parts of Nine Poetics are easy to use. For example, the answer to ‘How many churches have you built?’ should always be ‘None’. Similarly, if you encounter the instruction ‘Please do not break the glass lid’ you should always ignore it.

· You will find that all the other parts of Nine Poetics can also be turned into questions. For example, you can ask the question ‘Do I have my shoes cleaned before I go the exhibition?’ to find out if something that is demanding your attention is simultaneously telling you that you may not be worthy of it. You can then make a decision about your attention accordingly.

· Other parts of Nine Poetics will require practise before you can use them effectively. For example, ‘The meaning of this word is neither “mirror” nor “clock”’ can be both a prophylactic against some types of writing and the means of seeding others.

· As you become more confident in using Nine Poetics you will find that you can combine existing parts to make new ones. For example, ‘Today’s entrance is completely different from the usual clock’ could be a statement about prosody.


Note

· Any part of Nine Poetics may be reproduced and/or disseminated provided it is accompanied by the statement ‘© David Kennedy 2006’.






Copyright © David Kennedy 2006